, Building Relationships in Teams: Self-Disclosure and Trust, Building Wrestling

When people work in teams, they build relationships. Strong relationships allow for more productive and meaningful teamwork and collaboration. This cycle highlights the importance of relationships in teamwork. Relationships develop through working in teams and relationships enable individuals to work together in meaningful ways.

Given the importance of building strong relationships, it is essential to consider what skills and behaviors lead to the creation of strong and fulfilling relationships. By assisting children in developing these skills and behaviors, you are giving them tools to build a successful future that inevitably will require-and be enriched by-creating relationships and working with others.

Self-Disclosure

Self-disclosure is an act of revealing your thoughts and perspective about a present situation, or other relevant and meaningful information, to another person. Sharing personal thoughts is crucial when building relationships in teams. Self-disclosure allows team members to get to know one another better, identify common goals and overlapping values and, once common goals have been identified, allows you to work together toward accomplishing these goals. Just as strong relationships and teams are built through appropriate self-disclosure, the lack of self-disclosure between team members can result in the deterioration of relationships and influence the strength of a team. If an individual keeps quiet about his/her needs, desires and goals, other team members are likely to do the same; people in relationships tend to match the amount of disclosure coming from others. A breakdown in communication can lead to a team where members are not working together or recognizing and valuing one another’s needs and desires.

Trust

It is well-known that trust is the foundation for building and maintaining meaningful, productive relationships. This is certainly true of building relationships within a team, and when trust is established, team members are far more likely to take risks, communicate important information, and share personal thoughts and feelings through self-disclosure. Similar to the concept of self-disclosure, levels of trust are matched in relationships, and if one individual takes a risk and trusts others in the group, other team members are more likely to do the same. Feeling as though someone else trusts you makes it easier for you to trust that person in return.

Self-disclosure and trust are necessary in building relationships in many different contexts, including sports teams, the work environment, friend groups, and families. If adults can model these skills and behaviors, not only will the adults have more fulfilling and meaningful relationships, they will begin to teach their children how to build fulfilling and meaningful relationships in all areas of life.

, 7 Steps to Building a Farm Pond, Building Wrestling

Just like everything else in life, building a farm pond takes, first getting the idea, planning, preparation, location the actual digging. After all the hard work we add our own personalities to the pond with needed equipment and accessories. Then finally nature will take over, but we can help with adding plants and fish.

Step 1

The Idea:

When did building a farm pond become the idea? For some people it is just that they need water for the cattle. Others may have had a swimming pool and just are tired of taking care of it. Building a farm pond you can still swim, but also raise fish for food, fish for pets like a huge aquarium. Bring nature back to the property. And many more wonderful things

Step 2

Planning:

Once the thought has come and you have decided to act upon that thought: You will need to check to see if you need a permit. Most important you should check with the neighbors. They may have concerns, like little children. And if you need a permit or meeting is required from the local government or state there will be a larger circle of neighbors involved. It is better to come from you than a letter in the mail.

Step 3

Finding the perfect spot:

Building a farm pond will require a natural water source in order to fill and maintain the water level. This can be from under ground springs, small seeps, rain run off, or bypassing from a small stream. Is the spot located for your viewing pleasure and privacy, or displayed for everyone to see. A Lot depends on your use f the pond

Step 4

Preparation:

Finding the best spot is great but not knowing if the ground will hold water in that location is some thing that needs to be found out. Do this by digging test holes to determine the subsoil structure in the pond location. Other preparations will include what type of farm pond is being built. There are two basic ways and a combination of, Dug, Dam or a little of both.

Step 5

Do it:

Determine if building a farm pond is some thing you can do or want to do. Make the call to a couple excavating companies to get quotes and ideas from them. If you have the heavy equipment necessary to build the pond, still call and get some ideas or ask if they could walk you through the process.

Operating heavy equipment and building your own pond can be rewarding time, but the lack of experience and pond building know how will slow down the progress and if done improperly could lead to a failed pond.

Step 6

Accessories and needed equipment:

Accessories, equipment, wiring and piping should be budgeted in at the beginning planning stage. The ponds best friend and the plants and fish are oxygen. Will the pond be near an electrical source to run pumps for waterfalls or fountains? The pond may be secluded enough that a windmill or solar power equipment may be necessary. Decks, docks, boat or kayak for entertainment should also be thought of.

Step 7

Adding life:

Nature will provide life over time. This is your time to help get things started faster. Adding plants for color, shade and oxygen by adding lilies and depending on your location if they will be tropical or Hardy’s. Adding game fish for fishing and Koi for their vibrant colors, your enjoyment and they help to keep the pond clean. But be careful they like to eat the plants. Frog’s will come naturally within the first year. Other wildlife will find the pond too including bird’s ducks and geese.

This goes to show there are steps in building a farm pond. Skipping any of them could create major damage, hassles, or a pond that is not very enjoyable. For more in depth details take a look a my farm pond.com or the resource box below.

, Building and Managing a High School Soccer Program, Building Wrestling

The following interview is with Coach Bill Bratton, who was my Soccer Coach at Cross Keys High School in Atlanta, Georgia for the school year 1989-1990. I asked him for an interview to share his thoughts on Soccer. He has been involved with Soccer for over 25 years so I wanted to pick his brain on the subject.

Stafford:

Hello Coach, you have been coaching high school soccer for over 25 years. How did you first get involved in the sport?

Coach Bill Bratton:

Hi Stafford and thank you. Well I started coaching soccer in 1982 in DeKalb County in my first year teaching at Sequoyah High. The previous coach had left and the school needed someone to coach. The principal offered me the opportunity to take over the program.

Stafford:

How was that experience for you and how did you prepare for this new role as a High School Soccer Coach?

Coach Bill Bratton:

I will admit I had never played or coached soccer before. In the off season I spent time preparing and learning by reading books and going to clinics. I will also admit that the players knew more about the skills, the formations and what it took to play the game than I did but it was the coaching organization of putting a team together to play as a team that was my strength. I really enjoyed coaching soccer once I mastered the knowledge I needed.

Stafford:

How long did you coach at Sequoyah and how did you end up at Cross Keys?

Coach Bill Bratton:

I coached Sequoyah for 4 years before DeKalb began a consolidation program and I transferred to Cross Keys in 1986. I had the privilege of coaching the Keys program for the next 20 years. I earned my Georgia class D coaching license as well as a Class C level National Coaching license from the USSF. The situation at Cross Keys was much like Sequoyah, they needed a new soccer coach and the AP who would become the principal offered me the position.

Stafford:

How was the situation at Cross Keys, and what did it take to build the program?

Coach Bill Bratton:

It took hard work and discipline to build the program. My job involved rebuilding a program. It had lost its organization, discipline was amuck, and the program wasn’t winning, just 2 years from finishing 3rd in the state. I had to incorporate discipline into the program and to teach players what playing on a school competitive team meant and was needed to win. This progress was going to take many years to complete.

Players would tell me “Coach we just want to play”. Cross Keys was a highly transient school. It was a constant rebuilding progress every year. They had no understanding of playing as a team, that they had to come to practice, to commit, and to be successful they had to play as a team. As I look back that took 2-3 years to get across. Once we reached the point of players returning consistently, I started instilling in the players that we were playing to win. They were playing in a competitive environment. If they just wanted to play there were rec teams, club teams, and other leagues they could go and “just play”.

There were teams that we could beat just based on talent and skill alone so we had to start winning those games. Slowly players started to understand, but they had no knowledge of what playing for a State Championship” was or meant. But we started to win games we should of and it was time to go to the next level, winning games that were 50-50. Again this level took 3-4 years to develop. I constantly had to preach to the teams what we were out there to accomplish. We wanted to win games and develop. After getting to the point of winning 50-50 games, we needed to win games that we were not expected to win. Our goal was to make the region playoffs to go to the state playoffs. The final step in the development was to defeat teams no one expected us to. It was always my belief that we had the ability, the skills to play with anyone and defeat anyone on any given day. In my last 5 years at the Keys we had two teams to reach the 2nd round (sweet 16) level of the state playoffs.

Stafford:

Awesome! I see a pattern here and a valuable lesson to be learned. An opportunity was presented; Rather than turn it down because you had no prior experience in soccer at that time, you made the effort to learn about the subject by spending time ” preparing and learning by reading books and going to clinics”, etc. You mentioned it took work and discipline and eventually you mastered the knowledge that was needed to coach high school soccer, which I saw when my old high school merged with Cross Keys and I ended up playing for you in my senior year. You seemed to have had a passion for soccer and knowledge of the game and the know-how to get players excited for the game and team unity. But all of that was accomplished through your own hard work and effort. How important is “discipline” for the aspiring soccer player and anyone in general?

Coach Bill Bratton:

Let me start out by saying that I believe discipline is an important attribute for anyone to have. To achieve individual or team goals one must have self-discipline. Discipline can have many different meaning to each person. It can be a commitment to attending practices, to going beyond what is asked of one to do to prepare. Discipline comes from having goals and achieving goals come from being disciplined. Some say that my teams were disciplined. On a team there can be only one chief who must lead and lead by setting the discipline of what is expected from others. The others must be willing to accept the standards and work together to achieve for the benefit of the whole and not the individual. If the team has discipline many other honors will come their way.

For many years as the coach I would tell the teams our goals, the purpose of what we will be trying to achieve, and that to reach these ideals we must all be on the same page. Some years I would have players who as the season would progress would disagree with the discipline and feel that certain things were unfair. They would question the purpose, the lineup, and the style of play or other team discipline. Of course I would try to talk with them, explain what was being done and why, listen to their side of the picture. I always had an open door if a player wanted to talk or discuss issues but not in public or at practice or during a game. I recall one instance where 5 players who I had taken out of a game and disagreed with my decision that they left the team bench and set in the stands. These players were removed from the team immediately after the game. On another team years later the players felt the formation we were playing and the players in those positions was wrong. This time I gave that team the chance to play the players and the formation they felt we needed to be playing. I said you have a half to show me that I am wrong and if it doesn’t work it will be done my way and there will be no more discussion and if you cannot agree with my decisions you have a decision that only you can make. Well the team’s way didn’t work so at halftime I told the team I gave you your opportunity now it will be done my way.

I always in my 26 years of coaching have told every team that I coach (you might recall this)… I don’t care who you are, I don’t care how good you are (even if you are the best player), or who you know… If you have to be disciplined you will be disciplined. No matter how much it might hurt the team, you know the rules and you know if you break the rules you will be disciplined and I will discipline you.

Stafford:

Thanks Coach. Have you had any experience with Club Soccer (soccer outside of the school system)? What is your thought on Club Soccer and its impact on High School Soccer? For example, some players who play high school soccer in the Spring may have Club teams that they play for that trains Summer, Fall and even Winter!

Coach Bill Bratton:

My experience on coaching Club has been limited as I coached one year with a U-14 boys’ team with Roswell Santos club league. We won the Fall and Spring season championship. A few years later I worked with Concorde Soccer coaching a U-12 boys team for a year.

If a player is looking to be seen and has the dream of playing at the college level then the club system is the way to go. But keep in mind that this is for elite level players. If they are good enough there is a program that they can go through to reach a higher level of play if they have the talent. First is to be selected on a top level team, to try out for the State select teams, to reach Regional recognition, etc. In the summer they should attend a quality soccer camp to improve their skills and to be seen by college coaches. In high school some club coaches look down at the high school programs and encourage players not to play on their school teams for a lack of quality coaching, getting injured, lack of talent, and low level of play from many schools.

I encourage my players to find a club team to play on in the off seasons as it can only help to make them better. In the Fall if they are not playing on a club team, I encourage players to practice Cross Country to start developing their stamina and if possible to go out for wrestling in the Winter. Some club players come into the High School level and will tell me they can only play a midfield or an outside wing position. I try to teach my players that even though they played center midfield on their club team they are a great fit in the defense on the school team. Players need to keep an open mind and be willing to play the position that will give the team they are on the opportunity to be competitive and a chance to win.

Stafford:

Thanks Coach! Having been a club coach for several years, I can relate to the statement “some club coaches look down at the high school program and encourage players not to play on their school teams from a lack of quality coaching, getting injured, lack of talent, level of play from many schools.” Not that I have ever made that statement. However, that statement may have had some validity in the past, but do you see this changing as new generation of teachers who may be coaching high school or middle school presently are actually former soccer players who are also teachers, but may want to use the high school experience as a career path for some form of College/Professional coaching? This may be the case for some private schools.

Coach Bill Bratton:

Yes I see this getting better. The coaching at the high school level has shown major improvement in the coaches’ knowledge of the game. High schools teams now, like club teams can hire community coaches to help coach teams now and pay a stipend. These individuals must take the state required courses to become a community coach and follow the rules of the school, the county and state as they coach. So high school coaches who might lack in the skills and able to find someone willing to coach to teach/work coaching the players the skills or to work on the strategies and tactical aspects of the game. This is what many club teams do now. They have a person to run the run but pay hundreds of dollars a month for a named/quality individual who was a former player, etc to actual do the coaching.

Stafford:

****Coach Bratton retired in 2006, but after 7 years he wanted to get back into coaching and took over the varsity boys position at a High School in Fulton County (Georgia) as a community coach. It was great speaking to him again after so many years. ****

, Inner City Property Investments – 5 Wealth Building Strategies, Building Wrestling

Interested in emerging market investments? Well you don’t need not look overseas, there may be plenty opportunities nearby.

Inner city landlords are able to create wealth by organizing neighborhoods. They create value by helping people reconnect to their communities and their work results in nicer communities and increased property values.

Before you’re in position to benefit from this property investment strategy, you will need to buy a piece of inner city real estate in the right location.

Here are 5 keys to ensure your success:

1. Find property investments near the edge of the inner city. Strong opportunities exist along the fringe of the “good” and “bad” parts of town. The goal of an inner city property investment is to profit from improving the “bad” edge of town. Buy near the fringe and work to connect your property to the “good” part of town.

2. Work with a local neighborhood watch groups. Future profits are directly tied to the effectiveness of grassroots advocacy groups. An emerging market landlord needs these groups to provide passion, credibility, emotional support, media connections, political influence, and more. They provide the leverage you’ll need to resolve issues that hurt the area’s repetition. Work to strengthen these groups, but not concoct one from scratch. Starting from scratch requires a tremendous amount of credibility that you may not have with the neighbors.

3. Buy property investments near a transit hub. One strategy is to create housing that appeals to echo-boomers. This group is interested in sustainability and mass transit options. Moreover, as the cost of oil increases, so will the demand for transit-supported communities. Buy close to a transit hub and capture the emerging demand for this feature.

4. Buy property investments large enough to make your efforts worthwhile. Use best practices, honed from over 40 years of neighborhood watch case studies and other community organization tactics, to transform the largest blighted property you can afford. Find the big problem and reap a big profit when it’s restored.

5. Buy property investments within the sphere of influence of redevelopment projects. Your local redevelopment agency will be able to tell you what private or public efforts are in the pipeline. You’ll want to consider properties near these sites to capture the excitement and economic energy associated with them. The promise of a better tomorrow is a very effective negotiating point to share while trying to lease your property.

Helping a community get back on its feet is rewarding and collecting the equity from restoring the area’s reputation is a well deserved prize. Is this wealth building strategy for you?

I love the business adage instructing investors to study the “apple tree” and place their baskets where “apples” will fall. It suggests that careful, strategic planning leads to profits, and I’ve personally found this to be the case. Use these tips to find ideal inner city property investments and, with some community development work, you will soon have a basket full of equity.